Category Archives: General

Pardon our mess…

picture of empty computer carrels

Rentschler Library is getting new computers and some new furniture! While that’s happening, please excuse our mess!  Workers will be breaking down old computer carrels (at left) starting Aug. 18, assembling new computer tables, and setting up/installing other cool furniture. We will be open while this is going on (8am – 5pm Monday-Friday). The first batch of new computers has already been set up in our classroom (SCH 213).

pay for print station

One of the pay-for-print stations (at left) was also temporarily moved nearer to the individual study rooms.

In the meantime, if you need to use a computer, there are several groupings of them in the main part of the library, or you can use the new computers in our classroom. All of the computers are connected to printing so that you can print course schedules and any other documents you need.

Last chapter of Les Misérables appeared today in 1862

front page of French magazine featuring Les MiserablesOn this day (June 30) in 1862, French author Victor Hugo published the last installment of his massive novel Les Misérables. (A story on Vox.com celebrates the event.) Hugo is also the subject of a Google Doodle today to mark the achievement.

In those days, many novels were “serialized” (published in segments) in various newspapers and magazines so that middle-class readers could better afford to read them.

If you want to read the original 1200+ page version, Rentschler Library has one translation  and the Modern Library edition by a different translator. There is also an abridged version (link to Amazon.com) published by Barnes & Noble in 2003. There are also editions available in French and, of course, the movie and musical.

New books for summer

With the end of the fiscal year almost here, our purchasing of new books is complete until after July 1st. Still, there are a lot of great new titles on our display. Links below, either in text or in the book cover image will take you to the library catalog, where you can place a hold on the item.

book cover image Bostons Massacre“In 1770, British soldiers fired into a crowd of people, killing five. Hinderaker  deepens readers’ understanding of the event in a three-pronged approach: explaining the massacre’s historical context, examining the 18th-century documents that create dueling narratives of the event, and highlighting the different moments in history—namely the Kent State shootings and the Black Lives Matter movement—that invoke the massacre’s memory after violent crowd-policing incidents.” from Library Journal review

book cover image Good ChartsWe get a lot of questions at the Information Desk about how to turn data into effective charts. This book can help. From the publisher: ‘Good Charts will help you turn plain, uninspiring charts that merely present information into smart, effective visualizations that powerfully convey ideas.”

book cover Hag seedHag-Seed is 0ne of the latest additions to Hogarth’s collection of Shakespeare plays reimagined by novelists. “Atwood (Handmaid’s Tale) positively frolics in this rambunctiously plotted and detailed enactment of how relevant Shakespeare can be for a talented troupe behind bars. Supremely sagacious, funny, compassionate, and caustic, Atwood presents a reverberating play-within-a-play within a novel.”
from Booklist review

 

book cover Christopher marlowe“Because there is virtually no firsthand evidence about the beliefs or actions of Christopher Marlowe (1564–93), Riggs (English/Stanford; Ben Jonson, not reviewed) turns to the culture and time that created him. He does so with authority and vigor, recapturing the climate of religious flux and common disaster, not just in England but across Europe, that surrounded Marlowe’s youth.”
from Kirkus review

Poetry reading next Thursday, April 20th

Poetry reading event April 20 2017Please come to the 10th annual poetry reading event, Thurs. April 20th 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at Wilks Conference Center. Read your favorite published poem and enjoy free refreshments. Sponsored by Rentschler Library and the Department of Literatures, Languages, and Writing.

250 Poems: a Portable Anthology

Book cover of 250 Poems anthology

One of the poetry books added in the last year is the 3rd ed. of “250 Poems: a Portable Anthology,” ed. by Peter Schakel and Jack Ridl. This slim volume has a nice variety of chronologically-arranged poems from the last 500 years – from Geoffrey Chaucer, b. 1343, and his Prologue to the Canterbury Tales, to “Snail, or, To a House.” by Aracelis Girmay, b. 1977. The index includes a section that arranged the poems by content (eg. city life, patriotism, motherhood).  It also has a glossary of poetic terms, and some helpful advice on “How to Write About Poetry – and Why.” Short biographies of the poets are also available in the back of the book. We are featuring a poem by Natasha Trewethey called “History Lesson,” which appears on pg. 290. Trewethey was twice the Poet Laureate of the U.S. (2012 and 2014)  and Poet Laureate of Mississippi (her home state) and won a Pulitzer Prize in 2007 for her collection “Native Guard.” Her list of other awards is long.

History Lesson” by Natasha Trewethey, p. 290 of “250 Poems.”

I am four in this photograph, standing
on a wide strip of Mississippi beach,
my hands on the flowered hips

of a bright bikini. My toes dig in,
curl around wet sand. The sun cuts
the rippling Gulf in flashes with each   

tidal rush. Minnows dart at my feet
glinting like switchblades. I am alone
except for my grandmother, other side   

of the camera, telling me how to pose.
It is 1970, two years after they opened
the rest of this beach to us,

forty years since the photograph
where she stood on a narrow plot
of sand marked colored, smiling,

her hands on the flowered hips
of a cotton meal-sack dress.

Get research help!

Besides the start of tree pollen season, sneezing season, and warmer temps, it’s also time to start digging in to your research. Annotated bibliographies are soon due, then final papers or projects. Don’t wait until the last minute! Contact the librarians at Rentschler Library to get help. We can suggest research strategies or help you track down that one elusive fact that will help you make the grade.

Library Hours during Spring Break

March 18-19 (Sat. & Sun.) CLOSED
March 20-24 (Mon. to Fri.) – 8:00 AM – 5:00PM
March 25-26 (Sat. & Sun.) CLOSED