Category Archives: Promotional

Do YOU Haiku? Enter our Haiku Contest!

yoda from Star Wars

Swampy Dagobah —
even a Jedi Master
can’t keep his feet dry.

 

If you enter the Rentschler Library Haiku contest, you don’t even have to have a serious theme. That’s how wide open the contest is. Write one about your favorite popular culture thing, your dog, that time you got sick on the bus. As long as it’s cleverly done, we don’t care.

So go ahead…submit a haiku using our online form. Win, you just might.

Enter our Haiku Contest

haiku T-shirtApril is National Poetry Month and just one of the ways Rentschler Library is celebrating this year is with our Haiku Contest. Just write your own original haiku in the 5 syllable, 7 syllables, 5 syllable format and you could win a haiku T-shirt (at left.) You get to select your color and size, though.


The contest is open to all Miami-affiliated persons (students, faculty, 
and staff.) You can enter your haiku online at the URL below or stop by our display in Rentschler Library to fill out a form. We also have a small collection of haiku books on display for inspiration. 

Entry form: https://goo.gl/forms/kEGcAT9lSbPCsqQt2

What is a haiku? Here’s what the Academy of American Poets says:

“A traditional Japanese haiku is a three-line poem with seventeen syllables, written in a 5/7/5 syllable count. Often focusing on images from nature, haiku emphasizes simplicity, intensity, and directness of expression….. As the form has evolved, many of these rules—including the 5/7/5 practice—have been routinely broken. However, the philosophy of haiku has been preserved: the focus on a brief moment in time; a use of provocative, colorful images; an ability to be read in one breath; and a sense of sudden enlightenment and illumination.

Here’s a haiku from novelist and poet Richard Wright to get you started:

 From this skyscraper,
all the bustling streets converge
towards the spring sea

Continue reading

Spice up your research papers with Statista

Statista logoOne of the newest subscription databases we are offering is Statista, a portal to graphical representations of data over 80,000 topics from over 18,000 sources on a single platform. Categorized into 21 market sectors, it provides direct access to quantitative data on media, business, finance, politics, and a wide variety of other areas of interest or markets. Statista includes data sources such as market research reports, trade publications, scientific journals, and government databases.

You can dowload data as Excel spreadsheets, into PowerPoint, as PDFs, or in graphic format (.PNG files). The Infographics would make a great addition to a research paper or presentation. (Oh, and you can also create citations in APA, MLA, and Chicago styles). Here is a sample infographic about Google’s online empire:

Google infographic

Statista is listed on our Databases A-Z page, our Statistics – Research by Subject page, and is available from off campus with your Miami ID and password.

Cram Jam @ Rentschler Library

Rentschler Library and the Office of Learning Assistance are proud to offer Cram Jam again this semester. There’ll be peer tutors in a variety of subjects, librarians, snacks and coffee.  Open to all Miami students and hosted at Rentschler Library, Schwarm Hall, Miami Univ. Hamilton campus. The dates & hours of Cram Jam are:

Thursday, Dec, 7, 6-9pm
Saturday, Dec, 9, 12-5pm
Sunday, Dec, 10, 3-10pm

Love OhioLINK? They want to hear from you!

OhioLINK is seeking feedback from its users and would love to hear your opinions. Use this easy short survey and your testimonial may get featured on social media through their #TuesdayTestimonial.  If you need a little inspiration, here’s a short list of the resources that OhioLINK provides:

  • over 46 million books and other library materials
  • more than 100 electronic research databases
  • over 24 million electronic journal articles
  • over 100,000 e-books
  • nearly 85,000 images, videos and sounds
  • over 58,000 theses and dissertations from Ohio students at 31 Ohio institutions

Notes on the Assemblage – Juan Felipe Herrera

Book cover of Notes on the AssemblageThis last poetry-related blog post of National Poetry Month is about our current United States Poet Laureate, Juan Felipe Herrera.  He is the son of migrant farm workers and was educated at UCLA & Stanford. Herrera is a graduate of the prestigious Iowa Writer’s Workshop and is a performance artist, activist, teacher.

The Poet Laureate’s official title is “Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress.” The position “serves as the nation’s official lightning rod for the poetic impulse of Americans. During his or her term, the Poet Laureate seeks to raise the national consciousness to a greater appreciation of the reading and writing of poetry.”

Rentschler Library has Herrera’s “Half the World in Light,” and “187 reasons mexicanos can’t cross the border.” Our featured poem by Herrera is “Almost Livin’ Almost Dyin” which was published in his collection “Notes on the Assemblage (jacket cover at left) and was also published on the Poetry Foundation website.

for all the dead

                                                                                           & hear my streets
with ragged beats & the beats
are too beat to live so the graves push out with
hands that cannot touch the makers of light & the
sun flames down through the roofs & the roots that slide
to one side & the whistlin’ fires of the cops & the cops
in the shops do what they gotta do & your body’s
on the fence & your ID’s in the air & the shots
get fired & the gas in the face & the tanks
on your blood & the innocence all around & the
spillin’ & the grillin’ & the grinnin’ & the game of Race
no one wanted & the same every day so U fire &
eat the smoke thru your long bones & the short mace
& the day? This last sweet Swisher day that turns to love
& no one knows how it came or what it is or what it says
or what it was or what for or from what gate
is it open is it locked can U pull it back to your life
filled with bitter juice & demon angel eyes even though
you pray & pray mama says you gotta sing she says
you got wings but from what skies from where could
they rise what are the things the no-things called love
how can its power be fixed or grasped so the beats
keep on blowin’ keep on flyin’ & the moon tracks your bed
where you are alone or maybe dead & the truth
carves you carves you & calls you back still alive
cry cry the candles by the last four trees still soaked
in Michael Brown red and Officer Liu red and
Officer Ramos red and Eric Garner whose
last words were not words they were just breath
askin’ for breath they were just burnin’ like me like
we are all still burnin’ can you hear me
can you can you feel me swaggin’ tall & driving low &
talkin’ fine & hollerin’ from my corner crime & fryin’
against the wall

almost livin’ almost dyin’
almost livin’ almost dyin’

Poetry reading next Thursday, April 20th

Poetry reading event April 20 2017Please come to the 10th annual poetry reading event, Thurs. April 20th 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at Wilks Conference Center. Read your favorite published poem and enjoy free refreshments. Sponsored by Rentschler Library and the Department of Literatures, Languages, and Writing.