Category Archives: Promotional

Love OhioLINK? They want to hear from you!

OhioLINK is seeking feedback from its users and would love to hear your opinions. Use this easy short survey and your testimonial may get featured on social media through their #TuesdayTestimonial.  If you need a little inspiration, here’s a short list of the resources that OhioLINK provides:

  • over 46 million books and other library materials
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Notes on the Assemblage – Juan Felipe Herrera

Book cover of Notes on the AssemblageThis last poetry-related blog post of National Poetry Month is about our current United States Poet Laureate, Juan Felipe Herrera.  He is the son of migrant farm workers and was educated at UCLA & Stanford. Herrera is a graduate of the prestigious Iowa Writer’s Workshop and is a performance artist, activist, teacher.

The Poet Laureate’s official title is “Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress.” The position “serves as the nation’s official lightning rod for the poetic impulse of Americans. During his or her term, the Poet Laureate seeks to raise the national consciousness to a greater appreciation of the reading and writing of poetry.”

Rentschler Library has Herrera’s “Half the World in Light,” and “187 reasons mexicanos can’t cross the border.” Our featured poem by Herrera is “Almost Livin’ Almost Dyin” which was published in his collection “Notes on the Assemblage (jacket cover at left) and was also published on the Poetry Foundation website.

for all the dead

                                                                                           & hear my streets
with ragged beats & the beats
are too beat to live so the graves push out with
hands that cannot touch the makers of light & the
sun flames down through the roofs & the roots that slide
to one side & the whistlin’ fires of the cops & the cops
in the shops do what they gotta do & your body’s
on the fence & your ID’s in the air & the shots
get fired & the gas in the face & the tanks
on your blood & the innocence all around & the
spillin’ & the grillin’ & the grinnin’ & the game of Race
no one wanted & the same every day so U fire &
eat the smoke thru your long bones & the short mace
& the day? This last sweet Swisher day that turns to love
& no one knows how it came or what it is or what it says
or what it was or what for or from what gate
is it open is it locked can U pull it back to your life
filled with bitter juice & demon angel eyes even though
you pray & pray mama says you gotta sing she says
you got wings but from what skies from where could
they rise what are the things the no-things called love
how can its power be fixed or grasped so the beats
keep on blowin’ keep on flyin’ & the moon tracks your bed
where you are alone or maybe dead & the truth
carves you carves you & calls you back still alive
cry cry the candles by the last four trees still soaked
in Michael Brown red and Officer Liu red and
Officer Ramos red and Eric Garner whose
last words were not words they were just breath
askin’ for breath they were just burnin’ like me like
we are all still burnin’ can you hear me
can you can you feel me swaggin’ tall & driving low &
talkin’ fine & hollerin’ from my corner crime & fryin’
against the wall

almost livin’ almost dyin’
almost livin’ almost dyin’

Poetry reading next Thursday, April 20th

Poetry reading event April 20 2017Please come to the 10th annual poetry reading event, Thurs. April 20th 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at Wilks Conference Center. Read your favorite published poem and enjoy free refreshments. Sponsored by Rentschler Library and the Department of Literatures, Languages, and Writing.

April is National Poetry Month

For the month of April, the Rentschler Library blog will be featuring some of the great poetry books added in the last year. You should also know that the library is co-sponsoring a poetry reading event, on April 20th 11:30-1:00 at Wilks Conference Center with the Department of Literatures, Languages, and Writing. You can come read your favorite published poem. Refreshments will be provided.

Our first poetry book featured is a collection by Adrienne Rich, “Collected Poems: 1950-2012,” published by W.W. Norton in 2016.
A writer for Dissent called Rich the “most socially sensual and politically radical American poet of the 20th century.”*

One of the poems in this new collection, “What Kind of Times are These,” was also featured on the Poetry Foundation website recently.  A reviewer in Library Journal said the poem “starts with a granular, personal observation” and “unfolds into complex maps of wider awareness and realization.” **

What Kind of Times Are These”  Adrienne Rich

“There’s a place between two stands of trees where the grass grows uphill
and the old revolutionary road breaks off into shadows
near a meeting-house abandoned by the persecuted
who disappeared into those shadows.

I’ve walked there picking mushrooms at the edge of dread, but don’t be fooled
this isn’t a Russian poem, this is not somewhere else but here,
our country moving closer to its own truth and dread,
its own ways of making people disappear.

I won’t tell you where the place is, the dark mesh of the woods
meeting the unmarked strip of light—
ghost-ridden crossroads, leafmold paradise:
I know already who wants to buy it, sell it, make it disappear.

And I won’t tell you where it is, so why do I tell you
anything? Because you still listen, because in times like these
to have you listen at all, it’s necessary
to talk about trees.”

*Haas, Lidija. 2016. “The World of Adrienne Rich.” Dissent (00123846) 63, no. 4: 18-23.
** Muratori, Fred. 2016. “Collected Poems: 1950-2012.” Library Journal 141, no. 9: 82.

Fake News panel session at MUH Downtown

Fake news graphicThe phrase “fake news” has been in the news a lot before and after the 2016 election. What does the phrase mean? What are its implications for our democratic form of government and the mainstream media? Come find out a panel presentation this Thursday, March 16th, 6PM at the MUH Downtown Center.

The panel features Assistant Professor of Political Science, Dr. John Forren, Assistant Professor of Communication Dr. Leland G. Spencer, and Cox News’s Politics Reporter Michael D. Pitman.  Our moderator will be Sarah Woiteshek Pietzuch, Director of Civic Engagement at Miami Hamilton. There will be time for Q&A from attendees, and light refreshments will be served. The session is sponsored by Rentschler Library, the Center for Civic Engagement and the MUH Downtown Center.

 

Women’s History Month – Grace Hopper

hopperFor Women’s History Month, the blog is highlighting Grace Hopper, a groundbreaking computer scientist, mathematician, and an officer in the U.S. Navy. Our most recent book on Hopper is “Grace Hopper and the Invention of the Information Age,” by Kurt Beyer (MIT Press, 2012.  She is listed in “American Women Scientists: 23 inspiring biographies, 1900-2000,” by Moira Davison Reynolds. Here are some quick facts:

 

  • Earned a Ph.D in Mathematics from Yale University in 1934.
  • While working in private industry, she helped create the first “compiler” for computer languages (a compiler renders worded instructions into code that can be read by computers). This compiler was the basis for the later development of COBOL, a computer language used widely in the business world.
  • First woman to win the National Medal of Technology (1991)
  • When she retired as a rear admiral from U.S. Navy at age 79, she was at that time the oldest serving officer.
  • First woman of any nationality (and the first American) ever named as Distinguished Fellow of the British Computer Society
  • Posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2016 by Pres. Barack Obama for her accomplishments in the field of computer science.

 

African American History Month

picture of Harriet Tubman

1911 photo of Tubman, Library of Congress

February is African American History month and so this month the library’s blog is going to feature images, books, and other content to celebrate the contributions of African Americans, as well as info on any related events on our campuses. At left is Harriet Tubman, abolitionist, humanitarian and spy for the North during the U.S. Civil War.

Next up is the Taste of Soul Dinner & Silent Auction, on Feb. 11 from 6-9 p.m. at the Wilks Conference Center. Enjoy traditional soul food, a silent auction from 6 p.m. – 7 p.m., and entertainment by The Brotherhood Singer from 7 p.m. – 8 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for seniors (55+), and $5 for Miami students and children under 12. Call 513-785-3024 or email kingmm (“at” symbol) miamioh.edu.